SRS Crisafulli News

CUGS: Clean Up Goals

Posted by Laura Fleming on Thu, Jan 29, 2015 @ 13:01 PM

While I was traveling from Glendive, MT, where SRS Crisafulli is based, to New Orleans, LA, for Battelle’s 2015 Contaminated Sediments Conference, the EPA was making an emergency trip from its office in Colorado to Glendive to begin to deal with the Bridger Pipeline oil spill, before this also became a contaminated sediments problem.

This is a stark reminder that while many of these projects are long term, and have defined goals, there are emergencies that require immediate action.

Da Nang Airbase, Vietnam: Cleaning the Ground

Da Nang International Airport

Photo: Agent Orange Action Group

At the Battelle Conference, the most unusual presentation came from Dr. Kent Sorenson, of CDM Smith. His client is the United States Agency for International Development (USAID); the site is the Da Nang Airbase, Vietnam. This airbase was used by the US military from 1959–1975. At the north end of the airbase, Operation Ranch Hand mixed, loaded, and stored 100,000 barrels of Agent Orange. The toxic Dioxin (2,3,7,8 – TCDD) is a component of Agent Orange, and was left behind, devastating those with prolonged exposure. The residuals represent the highest levels of dioxin in the world. The clean-up, which is happening now, is Thermal Conduction Heating under Vacuum Extraction, with insulated covers, and heater wells. The volume of material requiring treatment is 42,000 m3 of soil and 45,000 m3 of sediment.

Environmental Remediation at Da Nang Airport: USAID Dioxin Contamination Project Progress: Soil Sampling

Last year, USAID and CDM Smith received an Honor Award in Environmental Communication from the American Academy of Environmental Engineers and Scientists. The award recognized the public information and stakeholder involvement program associated with remediation of dioxin contamination at the Da Nang Airport in Vietnam.

“As we prepare to move and clean this ground, so have we moved mountains to bring the United States and Vietnam to this landmark moment,” said U.S. Ambassador David B. Shear. “We are both moving earth and taking the first steps to bury the legacies of our past. I look forward to even more successes to follow,” he added. Two U.S. companies, CDM Smith and Tetra Tech Inc., were awarded the contract for construction management and oversight of the entire project in coordination with the Vietnamese ministry.

Kent Sorenson’s presentation was focused on the technical aspects of the remediation, and he acknowledged the political and cultural environmental impacts as well.

Other Remediation Sites presented:

The Gowanus Canal. Yes! The Gowanus Canal Photo:

brainware3000/Flickr

Photo: brainware3000/Flickr

This NYC site was originally a shallow wetland that was an authorized fill site in 1849. There were 3 manufactured gas plants (MGP) plants which discharged into the canal, in addition to sewage.

From the late 1800's to the mid 1900's, hundreds of Manufactured Gas Plants supplied homes and industry with fuel for heating, cooking, and lighting. Today, the New York State Department of Economic Conservation, and others, are overseeing the investigation and cleanup of contamination left behind from these plants.

Brian Carr, Assistant Regional Counsel, U.S. EPA, New York, presented on the history and proposed Gowanus Canal cleanup. There was a Record of Decision (ROD) in 2013. (I had total acronym fatigue and confusion.)

The 100 page ROD document – the Record of Decision – outlines the $500 million cleanup which is now proceeding.  What are we cleaning? There are PAHs, PCB’s and heavy metals, including mercury, lead, copper and bicycles on their way out of the Gowanus Canal.

Acronym cheat sheet:

PAH: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. PAHs have been identified as carcinogenic and mutagenic (as well as teratogenic), and are considered pollutants of concern for the potency of potential adverse health impacts; the same holds true of their presence at significant levels over time in human diets.

PCB: polychlorinated biphenyl. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), PCBs cause cancer in animals and are probable human carcinogens, and they have been widely disbursed in the environment, way beyond the Hudson River, which we have all heard so much about.

Conference Notes

This conference – the 8th – that Battelle has assembled on this topic was well attended. Organizers commented on the attendance of over 1,000 sophisticated project managers, scientists, vendors, contractors, and representatives of industry – Dow, DuPont, Honeywell, The Boeing Company – as well as the regulatory EPA, and the Scientific community from the Corp of Engineers.

Dr. Todd Bridges, Senior Research Scientist at the Research & Development Center of the US Army Corp in Vicksburg, Mississippi, was particularly outspoken, advocating for full and open deliberations within the Community of Environmental Remediation stakeholders.

Todd led a spirited review of decision making processes, and advocated that “sunlight is the best of disinfectants.”

The Conference’s closing roundtable panel addressed the question: Can Urban Master Planning Help Resolve the Cost/Benefit Impasse at Large Contaminated Sediment Sites. The panel told stories of reconnecting communities to their rivers, using design competitions and economic development projects to increase the values of the outcomes.

Great idea.

Yes, we will provide updates and comments on the impact of the January 17, 2015 Bridger Pipeline Yellowstone River oil spill on these pages in the weeks and months ahead.  So far, of the 50,000 gallons of oil originally believed released, responders have recovered more than 21,000 gallons from both the pipeline and the Yellowstone River.

Links:

USAID Da Nang Airport Cleanup

Gowanus Canal Record of Decision

Bridger Pipeline Oil Spill Response

Topics: EPA, habitat remediation, Glendive, International Market, Battelle, USAID, dioxin, Da Nang, Agent Orange, Bridger Pipeline

SRS Crisafulli Takes Notice of New Technology in Floating Wetlands

Posted by Elizabeth Kaiser on Wed, Jun 13, 2012 @ 13:06 PM

By Elizabeth Kaiser, SRS Crisafulli Marketing Manager

SRS Crisafulli spotlights an article from the magazine WaterWorld titled "Floating Wetlands Help Boost Nitrogen Removal in Lagoons" by Mark A. Reinsel, Ph.D.  Dr. Reinsel is a Professional Engineer who focuses on treating mining and other industrial wastewaters through biological, chemical and physical processes.

The article introduces us to research on floating treatment wetlands (FTW) and discusses FTW's ability to reduce nutrient levels in lagoons, including small municipal systems with average flows between 12 - 16 gallons per minute.

These studies review and compare the effectiveness of applications in wastewater treatment lagoons, raw wastewater, ponds and lakes, and agricultural runoff into waterways.  The earliest study conducted was for a Montana Board of Research and Commercialization Technology (MBRCT) grant.  The Rehberg Ranch, a planned community near Billings Montana, is one of the sites for this FTW study.

Floating Island resized 600

Rehberg Ranch Residential Subdivision, Billings, Montana.  Photo Credit:  Midwest Floating Island, LLC

Midwest Floating Island, LLC has published case studies summarizing FTW technology. Case studies include the Rehberg Ranch lagoon, McLean's Pit Landfill in New Zealand and an alternative nesting habitat in California. 

The Midwest Floating Island FTWs are constructed of post-consumer polymer fibers, vegetated with native plants.  FTWs mimic the ability of natural wetlands to clean water by bringing a "concentrated wetland effect" to any water body - in this case, an aerated wastewater lagoon.

Read the WaterWorld article Floating Wetlands Help Boost Nitrogen Removal in Lagoons.

About the author:  Mark A. Reinsel, Ph.D., P.E., is President of Apex Engineering. Dr. Reinsel has 27 years of experience in consulting, industry and academia.

Learn about the colorful history of Rehberg Ranch.

Submit your own Crisafulli product experience case history.

Watch Crisafulli product videos.

Shop the Crisafulli product catalog.

 

 

Topics: crisafulli, srs crisafulli, lagoon, Montana, Articles, habitat remediation

SRS Crisafulli Survey: Silty Rivers of the World

Posted by Elizabeth Kaiser on Wed, Jun 06, 2012 @ 13:06 PM

In Steven Solomon's book Water, The Epic Struggle for Wealth, Power and Civilizationhe lists some of the world's siltiest rivers.  Which river do you think is the most silty?  Let's take a closer look at 5 silty rivers.

A quick search on Wikipedia revealed the following data.

The Colorado River

colorado river indian reservation parker az0074 resized 600
 Photo Source:  Planetware.com; Horseshoe bend on the Colorado River in Arizona

The Colorado River is the principal river of the southwestern United States and northwest Mexico. The 1,450-mile (2,330 km) river is a vital source of water for agricultural and urban areas in the southwestern desert lands of North America. The river and its tributaries are controlled by an extensive system of dams, reservoirs and aqueducts, which furnish water for irrigation and municipal supplies of almost 40 million people both inside and outside the watershed.

The Colorado's steep drop through its gorges is also utilized for the generation of significant hydroelectric power, and its major dams regulate peaking power demands in much of the Intermountain West. Since the mid-20th century, intensive water consumption has dewatered the lower course of the river such that it no longer reaches the sea except in years of heavy runoff.

The Nile

Ancient Egypt Nile River resized 600
 Photo Source:  ancient-egypt.info; Ancient Egypt Nile River

The Nile is a major north-flowing river in northeastern Africa, generally regarded as the longest river in the world. It is 6,650 km (4,130 miles) long. It runs through the ten countries of Sudan, South Sudan, Burundi, Rwanda, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Tanzania, Kenya, Ethiopia, Uganda and Egypt.

The Nile has two major tributaries, the White Nile and Blue Nile. The Blue Nile is the source of most of the water and fertile soil.  The northern section of the river flows almost entirely through desert, from Sudan into Egypt, a country whose civilization has depended on the river since ancient times.

The Yellow River

The Yellow River
 The Yellow River at the Hukou Falls

The Yellow River or Huang He, formerly spelled Hwang Ho, is the second-longest river in China after the Yangtze and the sixth-longest in the world at the estimated length of 5,464 kilometers (3,395 mi).  Originating in the Bayan Har Mountains in Qinghai Province in western China, it flows through nine provinces of China and empties into the Bohai Sea.

Frequent devastating floods and course changes produced by the continual elevation of the river bed, sometimes above the level of its surrounding fields, has also earned it the name "China's Sorrow." 

 
The Yangtze

The Yangtze River
The first turn of the Yangtze at Shigu (石鼓) in Yunnan Province,
where the river turns 180 degrees from south- to north-bound

The Yangtze, Yangzi or Cháng Jiāng is the longest river in Asia, and the third longest in the world. It flows for 6,418 kilometres (3,988 mi) from the glaciers on the Tibetan Plateau in Qinghai eastward across southwest, central and eastern China before emptying into the East China Sea at Shanghai. It is also one of the biggest rivers by discharge volume in the world. The Yangtze drains one-fifth of the land area of the People's Republic of China (PRC) and its river basin is home to one-third of the PRC's population.

The prosperous Yangtze River Delta generates as much as 20% of the PRC's GDP.  For thousands of years, man has used the river for water, irrigation, sanitation, transportation, industry, boundary-marking and war. The Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze River is the largest hydro-electric power station in the world.  In recent years, the river has suffered from industrial pollution, agricultural run-off, siltation, and loss of wetland and lakes, which exacerbates seasonal flooding.


The Yellowstone River

Yellowstone River at Glendive resized 600
 The Yellowstone River At (SRS Crisafulli Factory Location) Glendive, Montana

The Yellowstone River  is a tributary of the Missouri River, approximately 692 miles (1,114 km) long, in the western United States. Considered the principal tributary of the upper Missouri, the river and its tributaries drain a wide area stretching from the Rocky Mountains in the vicinity of the Yellowstone National Park across the mountains and high plains of southern Montana and northern Wyoming.

In Montana the river has been used extensively for irrigation since the 1860s. In its upper reaches, within Yellowstone Park and the mountains of Montana, it is a popular destination for fly fishing. 

 

Which of our 5 rivers do you think is the world's siltiest river? (Choose one below.)

The Colorado
colorado river indian reservation parker az0074 resized 600

 The NileAncient Egypt Nile River resized 600

The Yellow
The Yellow River

 The YangtzeThe Yangtze River

The Yellowstone
Yellowstone River at Glendive resized 600

Topics: Montana, habitat remediation, river dredging, Glendive