Dredging World News Blog

Dredging and Shoreline Remediation

Posted by Elizabeth Kaiser on Wed, Dec 07, 2011 @ 08:12 AM

By Elizabeth Kaiser, SRS Crisafulli Marketing Manager

Many situations can complicate a shoreline’s integrity.  These can range from flooding, hurricanes and man-made disasters and can even include aquatic harvesting and human recreation.  Making efforts to protect a shoreline from these intrusions helps protect economic and recreational interests.  Shoreline remediation is an investment in the overall economic and natural habitat of a community.

As defined by the Erosion Control Technology Council (ECTC), Sediment Control is A practice that captures soil particles on site that have been detached and moved by wind or water.   While different methods and practices are used when it comes to shoreline remediation and sediment control we will examine a specific method, dredging and shoreline remediation.

Let’s look at the Southwest Mordecai Ecosystem Restoration Project or “SWMER”.  According to the SWMER Project Scope found at mordecaimatters.org, “The SWMER Project focuses primarily on several rapidly eroding areas on the southern rim of Mordecai Island.Southwest Mordecai Ecosystem Restoration Project

SWMER complements Mordecai Land Trust’s wave barrier project with the Army Corps of Engineers which involves the planned installation of a barrier off the western coast of Mordecai north of the SWMER area.

The SWMER project required careful planning on the part of Mr. Jim Dugan, President of Pond Recovery Services of Hainesport New Jersey and contractor for the SWMER project.

Jim Dugan has owned and operated dredges for many years and has used them in conjunction with Geotubes for the purposes of shoreline remediation.  He has contracted his restoration services throughout New Jersey and surrounding waterways including the Chesapeake Bay.  President of the Mordecai Land Trust, Jeffrey Hager, wrote of Jim Dugan, regarding the SWMER project, “He (Jim Dugan) proved to be an extremely competent and conscientious field manager,…”

Jim Dugan describes the SWMER project as a material handling challenge.  “We had to move 900 tons of sand to an island in the bay.”  As described in the Mordecai Matters Newsletter, Winter 2010 issue, SWMER involves the installation of close to 600’ of huge sand-filled fabric tubes called Geotubes, slightly off the south-western edge of Mordecai Island.  “The erosion has been severe here and the hope is to stabilize this fragile part of the Island and encourage the deposition of grasses and other organic materials between the island’s edge and the two long sections of Geotube.

Jim explained that they couldn’t use the sand from the bay so they transported 900 tons of clean sand from a nearby quarry by truck.  But how do you get the sand to the island?  “You have to pump it.”  Jim said there were 2 major challenges involved.

  1. Don’t plug the pipeline with too much sand
  2. Water/tide problem

Jim needed to use the water in the bay to mix with the clean sand in order to pump the sand underneath a navigation channel, across the island, and through floating line to the Geotube feed ports.  Jim needed a flexible solution. Since he was pumping downhill under a 15 foot channel, he couldn't risk shutting down with sand in the line. He used one of his Crisafulli dredges to act as a mobile sand pump to adapt to the wind and tide level fluctuations in the bay. The dredge would be flexible enough that his operator could adjust the articulating cutterhead height, angle and distance to the feed, thus keeping the sand-water mix at an constant rate. This also allowed frequent start-stop operation to flush the line and switch Geotube feed ports, thus filling the Geotubes evenly.

sand spreader

Jim used a hopper with a belt to deliver the sand to a sand spreader.  The sand spreader distributed the sand evenly to match the 8 foot wide dredge cutterhead.  The cutterhead mixed the sand and water allowing for an optimal pump mixture.

dredge sand pump

Using the dredge as a sand pump Jim was able to pump the sandy mixture up to ½ a mile directly into each of the geotube ports spaced 20’ apart.   “(This project) needed a lot of flexibility which the dredge allowed for” Stated Jim.

Read Jim Dugan’s SWMER blog of his progress in the Mordecai Matters Winter 2010 newsletter

Watch video of the shoreline with the installed geotubes at Mordecai Island Geotubes in Action on YouTube.

If you would like to email Jim Dugan, send your email inquiry to jimdugan@comcast.net.

Watch SRS Crisafulli videos.

Topics: Dredges, crisafulli, dredge, dredging, marina dredging, srs crisafulli, dredging abrasive materials, lagoon dredges, dredging system, dredging and pumps

Replacement Parts - Are They Worth Stocking?

Posted by Elizabeth Kaiser on Wed, Nov 30, 2011 @ 08:11 AM

By Troy Fercho, SRS Crisafulli Rental Equipment Specialist

We have all been there. You are right in the middle of a project and something goes out.  Of course it’s going to happen in the middle of your project – parts don’t usually go out while they are just sitting there idle.  So the age-old question is does it pay to stock those critical replacement parts?

In my 15 years in the sales industry, I can remember countless times when I had to overnight parts to contractors or customers who were in the middle of a project and who needed a critical replacement part that had put a stop to all production.  In the best case, the part is in stock and can be sent overnight. Let’s not talk about the production parts that take a week to manufacture, or the part that is on backorder and will take 7-10 days to arrive.

In the dredging industry what is the actual cost of not having those critical spare parts?  The following are just averages but you can plug in your own numbers.

Let’s use an impeller for example:

Cost with having spare part on hand

Initial Cost of Impeller - $1,500.00

Downtime replacing part – 3 hours

Cost of downtime (lost wages) – 3 hours x $200.00 per hour = $600.00

Shipping Charge - $50.00

Total = $2,150.00

 

Cost of not having spare part

Impeller Cost - $1,500.00

Downtime, 7 days manufacturing time + 2 days shipping – 9 days x 8 hours per day = 72 hours

Cost of downtime (lost wages) - 72 hours x $200.00 per hour = $14,400.00

Next day Shipping Charge - $500.00

Total = $16,400.00

 
Use this calculator and try it for yourself.


Spare Parts Management Calculator by World-Class-Manufacturing.com

It is an understatement to say that keeping critical spare parts on hand is imperative.  When you look at factors such as unpredictable demand, time tracking the part down, product availability, as well as the downtime waiting for the part, I would say stocking critical spare parts is a key business decision that will save you a lot of money in the long run.

sparepartsWe do have spare wheels but this one is for another customer.  I can expedite one for you, have it ready in about 6 months!

 

Now there are a couple of questions that you have to ask:

  1. What parts do you keep on hand?
  2. Where do you keep these parts?

To answer question number one, you should consider the working parts that will be subject to wear and tear (i.e. bearings, impeller).  These are the parts you need at the worst possible time – right in the middle of the job. They are the job stoppers.  If you are not sure which items would be best to keep on hand, speak with your operators or mechanics or call the manufacturer and have them give you a list.

Now let’s take a look at the second question.  This is as important as having the parts in the first place.  You planned ahead and stocked key parts, but when the time comes and you need them, you can’t remember where they are.  The best thing to do is to develop an inventory system for storing these parts and make sure that key people are aware of the system. 

You are not working your tail off to lose money or even to break even; you started your business to make money.  I know most of us think we don’t need these parts because we’ll change them out before needed and they won’t go out on you.  The reality is that a majority of people are just too busy and changing them out slips through.  Take a moment and consider the real cost of not stocking your critical replacement parts.

 

 

Need information about replacement parts for your Crisafulli product?

 

Click here:Contact us

Topics: dredging system, Product Information, Replacement Part, Spare Parts

Dredging Short Courses

Posted by Elizabeth Kaiser on Wed, Nov 23, 2011 @ 08:11 AM

By Eric Lillberg, SRS Crisafulli Senior Applications Engineer

When I first started as an applications engineer for SRS Crisafulli, I searched for information on the subject of dredging. I was surprised to find there was very little non-commercial content available. I have since found a pair of short courses, offered annually by Texas A&M, which I recommend highly to any professional interested in dredging. The Center for Dredging Studies at Texas A&M has amassed a teaching staff of notable individuals from the dredging world.

 Center for Dredging Studies

Dredging Engineering Short Course

Sixty four participants attended the 4 ½ day Dredging Engineering Short Course held January 11-15, 2010 at Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas.  The short course was sponsored by the Center for Dredging Studies in the Coastal and Ocean Engineering Division of the Zachry Department of Civil Engineering.  Participants received a certificate of completion and 2.9 continuing education units. 

A wide range of dredging and dredged material placement topics were covered including: dredge pump and slurry pipe flow principles; sediment re-suspension; basic geotechnical engineering and dikes; cost estimating; basic dredge laws; cutter suction and hopper dredges and dredge automation; modeling dredged material placement; contaminated sediments; geotextile tubes; instrumentation, surveying and positioning; silent inspector program; confined disposal and capping; environmental regulations; testing manuals; EPA and port perspectives; wetland creation; enhanced settling of dredged material; beach nourishment; sand-water separation techniques; and beneficial uses of dredged material.

The next Dredging Engineering Short Course is scheduled for January 9-13, 2012 at Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas.  More information and an application may be obtained from
r-randall@tamu.edu or Center for Dredging Studies.

 

Cutter Suction Dredge Simulator Short Course

The upcoming Cutter Suction Dredge Simulator Short Course will demonstrate the fundamentalCutter Suction Dredge Simulators of hydraulic dredging using a cutter suction dredge. Topics will include cavitation, deposition of sediment in the pipeline, cutter power, pipeline length limitations, pump power limitations, different sediments (fine sand, medium sand, stiff clay, etc), channel currents, and swing winch limitations.

In the January 2011 course the simulators were programmed with a 24-inch (610 mm) spud carriage and fixed spud dredge (other size dredges can be simulated as well).  Three simulators interfaced actual controls for a cutter suction dredge to personal computers, and each participant spent approximately 30 minutes on a simulator for each of 7 exercises.

In February a second simulator short course was offered for dredging personnel from the J. F. Brennan Company, of LaCrosse, Wisconsin.  In June a third simulator short course was conducted for the Bureau of Reclamation, of Yuma, Arizona. For the June course, the simulators were programmed with a 12-inch cutter suction dredge with spud carriage, to match the new dredge purchased by the Bureau from Ellicott Dredge.

The next simulator short course is scheduled for January 16-18, 2012 at Texas A&M in College Station, Texas.  More information and applications are available at  Center for Dredging Studies.

Topics: Dredges, dredge, dredging, dredging system, dredging and pumps

Dredge Pumping Systems Improve with VFD Motor Controls

Posted by Elizabeth Kaiser on Wed, Nov 09, 2011 @ 08:11 AM

Submitted by Dave Stoltenberg, Dredge Rental Specialist, SRS Crisafulli

Pumps and Systems MagazinePumps and Systems recently published an article by Christopher Jaszczolt titled “VFDs Improve Motor and Pump Control”.   The article discussed current applications of variable frequency driven (VFD) motor controls as an excellent method to improve on mechanical control methods.  VFD control systems have gained market share and visibility in the past decade as an excellent motor control methodology with the added benefit of energy conservation.  By implementing VFD controls on dredge pumps, dredges become much more usable with the typical slower processing speeds of dewatering systems. 

Jaszczolt says:  ”Preferably, some of the pumps can be shut down when demand is low, and the system can be designed so that the water pressure can be maintained by a single pump during periods of low demand. Properly designed lead-lag systems will improve the efficiency, performance and longevity of the pumping system.

Jaszczolt also tells us:  “Like a PLC—advanced VFDs can be programmed, monitored and maintained with PC-based software. Unlike a PLC, this software is generally provided free by the VFD supplier. VFD programming and monitoring software is also easier to use than similar software for PLCs because the software is for a single application specific rather than general purpose.

VFDs have been used to control pumps for many years. However, advanced pump-specific VFDs now allow users to improve motor/pump control and protection without the need for inefficient mechanical devices or costly PLCs.

 

Christopher Jaszczolt is an application engineer with the Drives and Motion Division of Yaskawa America, Inc., in Waukegan, Ill. He has a BSEE from Northern Illinois University and five years’ experience applying variable frequency drives in industrial applications.

Read Christopher Jaszczolt’s complete article online at:  VFDs Improve Motor & Pump Control

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Topics: Dredges, crisafulli, dredge, dredging, dredging system, dredging and pumps

Proactive Dredging: A Little Now or a Lot Later

Posted by Elizabeth Kaiser on Wed, Oct 19, 2011 @ 08:10 AM

By Isaiah Helm, Applications Engineer, SRS Crisafulli

 

If public works departments had a list of fun things to do, dredging sediment out of holding ponds would not be on it.  It’s like cleaning the shower in your bathroom.  Whether you make it a frequent quick job or an occasional laborious task, time and effort must be set aside to maintain a fixture that is as critical as it is uninteresting.  This is the scenario that played out for Georgia’s Cobb County-Marietta Water Authority (CCMWA) during the summer and fall of 2010, as reported in Public Works Magazine

CCMWA had two water treatment plants and a 25 million gallon reservoir in need of upgrade to meet the EPA’s Stage 2 Disinfectant and Disinfection Byproduct Rule of 2006.  During the upgrade, one plant would be running, one shut down.  The reservoir had to be at full capacity to do this.  Unfortunately, it hadn’t been dredged since 1978 and was half full of sludge.  

 proactive dredging resized 600The reservoir was restored to its original 14-foot depth
within six months.  (Photo Credit:  Public Works Magazine)

Timing of all the different upgrade stages coupled with the EPA deadline meant the reservoir had to be cleaned out in six months.  (The dredging had originally been scheduled to take place 2013-2014.) 

In other words, the CCMWA had to make up over 30 years of maintenance in 6 months (that would be one nasty shower!).  The result: increased scale, decreased competition, and ultimately an increased cost.  The amount of dewatering equipment doubled.  Four mobile belt presses and four recessed chamber presses were used.  Fifty trucks made four 45-mile round trips per day.  Bidding on the project was limited to the few large contractors who were even capable of completing the project.  There were five bidders and all five of them listed the same two companies as their subcontractors.  Total cost to dredge the reservoir and perform maintenance on the banks and sluice gates totaled just over $4 million.

The World Dredging Mining & Construction Journal [1] contains a version of the article authored by Steve Gibbs.  It goes on to discuss some observations from the project:

One of the lessons learned by CCMWA is the need for regular dredging of the reservoir.  One benefit of regular dredging is economics – greater capacity in the reservoir reduces the amount of pumping necessary to bring water from the Chattahoochee, thus saving electrical costs.  Also, doing a smaller dredging project every five years or so will eliminate the need to do a massive project such as the one just completed.

A deeper, cleaner reservoir will allow suspended solids to settle out better, which will enhance treatment efficiency.  The reservoir will also have ample capacity while the treatment plants are in their construction phase.

“This (the reservoir dredging project) will decrease the potential for water quality problems or process issues at our treatment plants,” said Ginn (CCMWA process engineer). “It’s a very good proactive preventive maintenance step.”

There you have it.  Proactive dredging of sludge-collecting ponds really does make life easier in the end.  It also increases the options:

  • Put out a request for bids on that smaller dredging project every five years

  • Contract with a dredging company to clean out the pond every five years

  • Rent dredging and dewatering equipment directly and eliminate the middleman

  • Purchase an automated or remote dredging and dewatering system and have it permanently installed for complete self-sufficiency

At least it’s something to think about while you’re cleaning your shower tonight.

 

[1] World Dredging Mining & Construction Journal, “Proper Planning for a Perfect Project” (Volume 46, Nos. 11/12, Page 16)

 

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Topics: Dredges, crisafulli, dredge, dredging, srs crisafulli, dredging abrasive materials, lagoon dredges, dredging system, dredging and pumps, dredging equipment rentals, rotomite sd110, lagoon, rotomite 6000c, Hydraulic dredging, rotomite 6000

Dredging for Gold in Remote Places

Posted by Elizabeth Kaiser on Wed, Aug 31, 2011 @ 09:08 AM

By Dave Stoltenberg, Dredge Rental Specialist with SRS Crisafulli

 

From Alaska to West Africa, SRS Crisafulli dredging experts are busy installing dredges and training operations personnel at producing gold mines.  Nearly all operating mines have overflow lagoons and impoundments for the collection of particulates, overflow mud, and tailings.  Typically the lagoons are lined, and are operated as part of a water treatment system to ensure all water released from the mine meets environmental regulations.  In many cases the water and particulates are acidic in nature and require specialized equipment adaptations such as stainless steel construction to ensure longevity.

Press play to view SRS Crisafulli FLUMP Dredge video

Gold mine companies find SRS Crisafulli Flumps to be an excellent choice for a variety of projects.  Small, remote controlled, extremely productive, and a high value, Flumps perform well across a wide range of applications and environments.  Project applications at gold mines are primarily for the purpose of either dredging waste sediments for dewatering and disposal or for the purpose of recovering gold from tailings or overflow sediments.  When used to dredge for disposal the sludge is sent to centrifuges or geobags, dewatered, and then disposed of.  When used to dredge for gold recovery the tailings are sent to a processing mill so the sediments can be re-processed.  In some cases tailings are recently produced, and in other cases the tailings are historical in nature yet still contain recoverable amounts of gold.

 

Gold Mine Dredging in Alaska










 

From Gold Mines in Alaska

 

 

Gold Mine Dredging in West Africa

To Gold Mines in West Africa

One characteristic shared by both Alaskan gold mines and West African gold mines is remoteness.  These operations, encompassing surface mines and underground mines, are a testament to the abilities of companies to build and sustain small cities in some of the most inaccessible locations in the world.  Alaskan locations are noted for their short summer periods and long duration cold winters while West Africa, south of the Sahara desert, is tropical in nature, with high temperatures and humidity.  Regardless of the environment, SRS Crisafulli’s attention to detail, rigorous manufacturing standards, and ability to customize solutions to the most demanding requirements results in long-lasting, dependable dredges.

Whatever your mining application, wherever in the world it might be, give one of our SRS Crisafulli dredging experts a call today to solve your problems.

 

Learn more about SRS Crisfaulli FLUMPs.

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SRS Crisafulll Dredges FAQ.

Topics: Dredges, crisafulli, dredge, dredging, dredging abrasive materials, mining

How Dredging Equipment Rentals Provide Multiple Advantages

Posted by Elizabeth Kaiser on Thu, Aug 11, 2011 @ 13:08 PM

By Dave Stoltenberg, Dredge Rental Specialist with SRS Crisafulli

For many industrial projects, rental equipment is the way to go.  Especially for many dredging applications, which in most cases are only required periodically, with many years separating the jobs, rental equipment delivers a number of advantages.  Offering increased flexibility to respond to changing project requirements while avoiding capital investment, rental dredging equipment offers additional benefits such as:

  • Reduced maintenance costs
  • Faster ability to respond to emergencies
  • Better allocation of scarce project dollars
  • Access to dredging expertise, consultation, and training
  • No need for long term amortization across multiple projects

Rented dredging equipment can be used to augment a wide range of projects which contractors typically are asked to perform.  In addition to contractors, facility owners are surprised with how easy dredging is to learn, and can take advantage of short term equipment rentals.  Project applications for which rented dredging equipment is a perfect match include:

 
FLUMP dredge rental
  • Marinas
  • Golf Courses
  • Retirement Communities
  • Many industrial facilities such as paper, chemical, oil, and gas
  • Mining
  • Municipal water and wastewater

SRS Crisafulli maintains a rental fleet of dredging equipment to meet a wide variety of the most demanding dredging applications.  Our FLUMP and Rotomite dredges are state-of-the-art designs for maximum solids production, priced at a high value, cost effective rental rate. 

Contact us today for a dredging project consultation.

Learn more about SRS Crisafulli Dredge Rentals.

Request a Dredge Application form.

Please have Dave contact me about dredge rentals.

Topics: crisafulli, dredging, srs crisafulli, dredging equipment rentals

Ask a FLUMP Expert. Seven ways to Secure your Traverse System

Posted by Elizabeth Kaiser on Thu, Jul 28, 2011 @ 08:07 AM

The propulsion and traverse systems are critically important to the operation of an unmanned, cabled dredge. The FLUMP, SRS Crisafulli's unmanned dredge, propels itself along a traverse cable connected to lateral cables at opposite sides of the lagoon, configured at 90 degrees to the traverse cable.

The FLUMP's drive system is onboard.  SRS Crisafulli's FLUMP Specialist, Senior Applications Engineer Eric Lillberg, explains seven ways to secure the lateral traverse cables to land, on opposite sides of the lagoon.

The standard method is to drive three 48" long stakes into a triangular steel base plate on each of the four corners of the lagoon or pond.  From the four corners, wire rope winches are connected to each lateral cable, each of which is connected in turn to the traverse cable that runs the length of the lagoon.  The corner winches can exert 2,000 lbs. of tension into the cable system. 

Normally, this method provides more than adequate results, depending on the length of the traverse cable.

traverse 1 resized 600

Even at 700 lbs. of tension, however, a base plate can be pulled out of soft ground, which leads us to Method #2, a daisy chain setup with multiple stakes connected by chains or cables.

Method #3:  In more permanent installations the use of concrete bollard posts is an economical solution. 

 Traverse   2

 

Method #4: A motorized trolley system mounted on a steel rail structure. A rail structure with a motorized trolley system is the preferred method for permanent installations.  The rail structure adds cost to the system, but can result in a substantial reduction in ongoing operator cost thereby improving the overall return on investment (ROI) from the dredging system.  Traverse 3 resized 600

 

Method #5:  When the lagoon is surrounded by hard packed or rocky terrain, other methods have been utilized, including large concrete blocks, about 32" x 32" x 64" and weighing approximately 5700 lbs.  Depending on the lay of the land, it may take some jockeying to prevent the blocks from sliding, once tension is applied.

 Traverse 4 resized 600

 

Method #6:  We have drilled holes in existing rock and concrete structures to set anchors. 

Method #7:  A not so common, but equally effective approach is to use two motor vehicles, one on each side of the lagoon.  Skilled drivers move the two vehicles in perfect parallel, enabling the system to work with no adjustment to the traverse system. Traverse 5 resized 600

 

No matter what the method, a taut cable is essential to effective unmanned dredging.

Read more about SRS Crisafulli's Cable Traverse System.

Click here to ask us a question.  Mention Eric's article.

Topics: lagoon dredges, dredging system, flump, agriculture

Why Zambia? SRS Crisafulli Mine Dredges Provide Useful Options.

Posted by Elizabeth Kaiser on Thu, Jul 21, 2011 @ 08:07 AM

African Growth and Opportunity Act, or AGOA Forum 2011, Lusaka, Zambia was an odd destination.  But that is where a Montana delegation of Small and Medium Enterprises, or "SMEs" went in early June, 2011.  The overarching goal of the AGOA Forum is to increase US - Africa trade volume.  Why would SRS Crisafulli participate?  SRS Crisafulli Dredges provide reliable and effective water management solutions to the mining industry in Africa.  Many African countries, including Zambia, are actively mining gold, copper and uranium, all of which need water management tools.  The Crisafulli dredges provide useful options for environmental managers at mines throughout the world.

Further, the classic Crisafulli trailer pumps, so useful to the US Army Corp of Engineers in dewatering US properties submerged in the Floods of 2011, may be of service to African growers managing water resources.

"I am excited to return to Zambia.  Next time I will visit the Zambian Copperbelt itself, take a helicopter ride over Victoria Falls, and go on a traditional safari.  In the meantime, I packed my bag with Zambian honey, and am buying imported South African wines from my neighborhood wine cellar," reports SRS Crisafulli attendee, President and CFO Laura M. Fleming.

Montanas in Lusaka, Zambia
Montanans in Lusaka, Zambia:  Laura M. Fleming, SRS Crisafulli, Inc.,  Joan Wadelton, diplomat, State Department, Africa Women's Entrepreneurship Program (AWEP) and Cora Neumann, Co-Director African First Ladies Fellowship Program, under the big tent at the conclusion of AGOA Forum.

"Greetings to my fellow travelers,"  Click here:  AGOA Zambia 2011 - Laura Fleming - Picasa Web Albums - some snapshots from the AGOA Forum.

Thanks to the support of the Montana World Trade Center and the Corporate Council on Africa:  Click here:  Montana World Trade Center Press Release

Congratulations to Secretary Clinton on her fine leadership: 

 

Congratulations on political stability, economic growth and an excellent outlook to the citizens of Zambia.  Click here:  Embassy of Zambia - Economy

 

 

 

Topics: Dredges, crisafulli, dredge, agriculture, mining, AGOA

For $50,000, who wants to be a SRS Crisafulli Millionaire?

Posted by Elizabeth Kaiser on Thu, Jul 14, 2011 @ 13:07 PM

SRS Crisafulli's factory location is intriguing.  SRS Crisafulli is a dredge and pump manufacturer with a factory in land-locked Eastern Montana.  "Glendive, Montana is a unique and very rural community" says SRS Crisafulli President/CFO, Laura M. Fleming. "Glendive is about as far off the beaten track as can be found in modern America. We had two visitors from Israel this week, and sent them home with special stories about Eastern Montana."SRS Crisafulli Factory Employees

"Good People Surrounded by Badlands" is a phrase promoted by the Glendive Chamber of Commerce.  "It was even a $50,000 question on Who Wants to be a Millionaire" adds Ms. Fleming.

"When I present at public speaking events, I use the phrase:  'The River is our Teacher.'  The Yellowstone River and the unique terrain in Eastern Montana created the Company - and vice versa - the people who homesteaded in this area developed unique irrigation methods and technology.  The landscape contributes to the DNA of SRS Crisafulli" says Ms. Fleming.

Photojounalist Lynn Donaldson has visited the Glendive and the SRS Crisafulli factory on several occasions.  "You may visit Lynn's Montana blog at www.placesbetweenspaces.com where you will get a taste of real Montana", says SRS Crisafulli Sales Manager Maureen Lundman.

Yellowstone River at Glendive

The 28 year SRS Crisafulli veteran employee, Ms. Lundman, says "Glendive, our 'City by the Yellowstone', offers unrivalled scenery.  The mighty Yellowstone River bisects the town.  We're always watching the river."

Makoshika State Park

"Glendive is bordered by the rugged and majestic Makoshika State Park. Makoshika (Ma-ko'-shi-ka) is a variant of a Lakota phrase meaning land of bad spirits or badlands."

"Glendive is a warm & welcoming community, and a great place to live--with an excellent school system, a 2-year college, state-of-the-art medical facilities, fantastic hunting, fishing and recreation, as well as a good share of the fine arts available locally."

"SRS Crisafulli employees count themselves as fortunate to live under Montana's Big Sky!" comments Ms. Lundman.  

For additional background about Glendive, please visit:  www.glendivechamber.com

For additional information about Makoshika State Park, please visit:  www.makoshika.org

For a taste of real Montana, please visit Photojournalist Lynn Donaldson's blog:  www.placesbetweenspaces.com

Topics: Dredges, crisafulli, dredge, dredging, marina dredging, srs crisafulli, lagoon dredges, International Exports, Hydraulic dredging